Historiography of the North American West

taught by David M. Wrobel. Bibliography available at this link.

Download complete syllabus at this link.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Historiography—the history of historical writing and thinking—considers historical scholarship within the intellectual and cultural contexts from which it emerged.  This course examines the historical writing on the American West (including the Mexican and Canadian borderlands) from the late nineteenth century to the present.

The field of western history has experienced a renaissance in the last three decades and approximately half of our class sessions will focus on these more recent developments.  However, the West first became a subject of interest to professional historians in the late nineteenth century and vital contributions to the field were made during the century preceding the advent of the New Western History, in the late 1980s and early 1990s.  The first half of the course focuses on this earlier scholarship.

However, and contrary to popular perceptions of a frontier paradigm (the Turnerian model) being supplanted by a regional paradigm (the New Western History), both of these thematic frameworks—frontier and region—have operated for more than a century and a quarter.  In recent decades, though, historians have more commonly rejected the frontier model, turning increasingly to the twentieth century West, gender, leisure, labor, race relations, urban and environmental history, borderlands and comparative global contexts.  Still, the historiographical terrain is nothing if not ever shifting, and the last decade or so has also seen a resurgence of interest in the nineteenth century West.

The course places these developments in American western history into a broader national historiographical context for the purpose of addressing the degree to which western historians have, at different times, been on the cutting edge of American history scholarship, or behind the curve of new trends and developments.

Class sessions will be conducted mostly in a seminar format.  However, discussions will generally be preceded by short, informal lecture overviews of the major works and key historiographical issues, particularly during the first half of the semester.  The quality of class discussions is dependent upon your close familiarity and careful engagement with the assigned materials. We will examine approximately a book’s worth of material each week.  Familiarizing yourselves with these readings now will facilitate your preparation for comprehensive exams.  I strongly encourage you to write a one-paragraph to one-page summary and analysis of every assigned article, essay, and book chapter, and a somewhat longer summary and analysis of each course book as part of your class preparation.

OBJECTIVES/LEARNING OUTCOMES

There are three primary objectives:

  • To enhance understanding of the historiography of the American West by considering it in relation to larger national historiographical contexts, and, global contexts, too.
  • To facilitate preparation for comprehensive examinations in the North American West field.
  • To improve written, oral communication, and critical thinking skills through the construction of thematic frameworks, writing, rewriting, and oral presentation of essays, and the careful and collaborative discussion of course readings

REQUIRED COURSE READINGS

  • Richard Etulain, ed., Writing Western History: Essays on Major Western Historians (Reno and Las Vegas: University of Nevada Press, 2002; Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1991).
  • Patricia Nelson Limerick, The Legacy of Conquest: The Unbroken Past of the American West (Norton, 2006, 1987).
  • Frederick Jackson Turner, “Rereading Frederick Jackson Turner: “The Significance of the Frontier in American History” and Other Essays, ed. John Mack Faragher (Yale, 1998; New York: Henry Holt and Co., 1994).
  • Elliott West, The Essential West: Collected Essays (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2012).
  • Richard White, The Organic Machine: The Remaking of the Columbia River (Hill and Wang, 1996).
  • Donald Worster, Under Western Skies: Nature and History in the American West (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992).
  • *David Wrobel., comp., “Historiography of the North American West, 1891-2013: A Reader” (Pdf. Files available on the course D2L site, arranged by week).

COURSE SCHEDULE

Wk 1: Aug. 19:           Introduction + The West in Popular & Historical Imaginations

Wk 2: Aug. 26:           The West as Frontier

Wk 3: Sept. 9:             The West as Region

Wk 4: Sept. 16:           The West as Myth & Memory

Wk 5: Sept. 23:           “C” Words, I: Colonialism, Comparison, Capitalism, & Continuity

Wk 6: Sept. 30:           “C: Words, II: Continuity (continued!) & Conquest

Wk 7: Oct. 7:              The New Western History      (*WHA Meeting, Tucson, Oct. 9-12)

Wk 8: Oct. 14:            The New West in Art & Literature    (*WHA feedback)

Wk 9: Oct. 21:            Where the West is & Why it Matters: Maps, Borders & Oceans

Wk 10: Oct. 28:          Western Environments, I: Cities

Wk 11: Nov. 4:           Western Environments, II: Water

Wk 12: Nov. 11:         Western Environments, III: Wilderness

Wk 13: Nov. 18:         Western Cultures: I: Gender, Sexuality, & Labor

Historiography Presentations, Group A

Wk 14: Nov. 25:         Western Cultures: II: Race Relations, & Labor

Historiography Presentations, Group B

Wk 15: Dec. 2:            Western Cultures, III: New Indian Histories, & Labor

Historiography Presentations, Group C

Wk 16: Dec. 9:            Newest Wests, 2010-13: State of the Field:  Your Choices!

Historiography Presentations, Group D

Historiography Papers Due (submit hard copy & MS Word file)

SYLLABUS APPENDICES

APPENDIX I: ASSIGNMENTS

Review Essay (due in class, Week 3, September 9-Week 12, November 11):

An 8-10 page essay on two or three related books, up to two of which may be required course books.  Review essays should provide a full summary and analysis of each of the works, but should do so within a thematic framework of your own construction.  Please consult the Journal Reviews in American History for model review essays.

     Possible groupings and pertinent works include, but are not restricted to:

HISTORIANS & HISTORIOGRAPHY

A HISTORIAN: e.g., Limerick, Desert Passages, The Legacy of Conquest; Something in the Soil; White, The Roots of Dependency, The Middle Ground, It’s Your Misfortune and None of My Own, The Organic Machine, and Railroaded; Cronon, Changes in the Land, Nature’s Metropolis, and Uncommon Ground; Worster, Dust Bowl, Rivers of Empire, Under Western Skies, A River Running West, A Passion for Nature; Nugent, The Tolerant Populists, Into the West, Habits of Empire; West, Growing Up with the Country, The Way to the West, The Contested Plains, The Last Indian War; Hurtado, Indian Survival on the California Frontier, Intimate Frontiers, John Sutter, Herbert Eugene Bolton

ANTHOLOGIES:  Limerick, et al, ed., Trails; Milner, ed., A New Significance;

Cronon, Miles, and Gitlin, eds., Under an Open Sky; Wrobel and Steiner, eds., Many

Wests; Milner, O’Connor, and Sandweiss, eds., The Oxford History of the American

West; Deverell, ed., A Companion to the American West; Nugent and Ridge,

eds., The American West: The Reader; Matsumoto and Allmendinger, eds., Over the

Edge; Hausladen, Gary J.  Western Places, American Myths; Wrobel, ed., “The West

Enters the Twenty-First Century”; Nash and Etulain, Researching Western History;

Etulain, Writing Western History; Nash and Etulain, The Twentieth-Century West:

Historical Interpretations; Ritchie and Hutton, eds., Frontier and Region; Gressley, ed.,

Old West/New West

ANTHOLOGIES (SINGLE-AUTHOR): Limerick, Something in the Soil; Turner, The Frontier in American History, and The Significance of Sections in American History;

West, The Essential West; Worster, Under Western Skies

BIOGRAPHY: Bogue, Frederick Jackson Turner; Billington, Frederick Jackson Turner;

Hurtado, Herbert Eugene Bolton; Etulain, ed., Writing Western History; Topping, Utah Historians and the Reconstruction of Western History

HISTORIOGRAPHIC OVERVIEWS: Nash, Creating the West; Etulain, Reimagining the Modern American West; Jacobs, On Turner’s Trail; Klein, Frontiers of Historical Imagination; Novick, That Noble Dream: Higham, History: Professional Scholarship in America; Hofstadter, The Progressive Historians: Turner, Beard, Parrington

 PLACE

ENVIRONMENT:  Cronon, Uncommon Ground, The Middle Ground, Nature’s Metropolis; Worster, Under Western Skies, and Dust Bowl; Jacoby, Crimes Against Nature; Warren, The Hunter’s Game; Linda Nash, Inescapable Ecologies; Nash, Wilderness and the American Mind; Kirk, Counterculture Green; Price, Flight Maps; White, The Organic Machine; Taylor, Making Salmon, and Pilgrims of the Vertical; Rome, The Genius of Earth Day, and The Bulldozer in the Countryside; Rothman, Blazing Heritage; Sachs, Arcadian America: The Death and Life of an Environmental Tradition; and The Humboldt Current: Nineteenth-Century Exploration and the Roots of American Environmentalism; Fiege, The Republic of Nature, and Irrigated Eden; Flores, The Natural West, and Horizontal Yellow; Childers, American Powder Keg

THE NORTHERN BORDERLANDS: Evans, ed., The Borderlands of the American and Canadian Wests; Jameson, ed., One Step Over the Line: A History of Women in the North American Wests; Chang, Pacific Connections: The Making of a U.S.-Canadian Borderland; Binnema, Common and Contested Ground: A Human and Environmental History of the Northwestern Plains; LaDow, The Medicine Line: Life and Death on a North American Borderland; McManus, The Line which Separates: Race, Gender, and the Making of the Alberta-Montana Borderlands; Graybill, Policing the Great Plains: Rangers, Mounties, and the North American Frontier, 1875-1910; Johnson and Graybill, eds., Bridging National Borders in North America; Hirt, ed., Terra Pacifica: People and Place in the Northwest States and Western Canada; Higham and Thacker, eds., One West, Two Myths: A Comparative Reader; Higham and Thacker, eds., One West, Two Myths II: Essays on Comparison; Finlay and Ken Coates, eds. Parallel Destinies: Canadian-American Relations West of the Rockies; McCrady, Living with Strangers: The Nineteenth-Century Sioux and the Canadian-American Borderlands

THE SOUTHWEST BORDERLANDS: Weber, The Spanish Frontier in North America and Barbaros; Brooks, Captives and Cousins; Bolton, The Spanish Borderlands; McWilliams, North From Mexico; Johnson, Revolution in Texas; Truett, Fugitive Landscapes; Truett & Young, Continental Crossroads: Remapping the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands History; St. John, Line in the Sand; Hernandez, Migra: A History of the U.S. Border Patrol; Mora, Border Dilemmas; Benton-Cohen, Borderline Americans; Johnson and Graybill, eds. Bridging National Borders in North; Meeks, Border Citizens: The Making of Indians, Mexicans, & Anglos in Arizona; Barr, Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands; America; Jacoby, Shadows at Dawn; Castañeda, ExMex: From Migrants to Immigrants; Cohen, Braceros: Migrant Citizens & Transnational Subjects in Postwar United States and Mexico; Reséndez, Changing National Identities at the Frontier: Texas & New Mexico, 1800-1850; Walsh, Building the Borderlands: A Transnational History of Irrigated Cotton along the Mexico-Texas Border; Deutsch, No Separate Refuge: Culture, Class, & Gender on an American-Hispanic Frontier…1880-1940; Forjas, Border Bandits: Hollywood on the Southern Frontier; Nieto-Phillips, The Language of Blood: The Making of Spanish-American Identity in New Mexico, 1880s-1930s; Monroy, The Border Within: Encounters Between Mexico & the U.S..

REGIONALISM: Ayers et. Al., All Over the Map; Dorman, Revolt of the Provinces, and Hell of a Vision; Wrobel and Steiner, eds., Many Wests, Etulain, Reimagining the Modern American West; Meinig, Transcontinental America; Riebsame, ed., Atlas of the New West (+ Roundtable of Responses in PHR); Emmons, “Constructed Province,” (+Roundtable of Responses in WHQ); Pomeroy, The Pacific Slope, and The American Far West in the Twentieth Century

GLOBAL & TRANSNATIONAL WESTS: Banner, Possessing the Pacific: Land, Settlers, and Indigenous People from Australia to Alaska; Evans, Bound in Twine: The History and Ecology of the Henequen-Wheat Complex…; Belich, Replenishing the Earth; Igler, The Great Ocean: Pacific Worlds from Captain Cook to the Gold Rush; Jacobs, White Mothers to a Dark Race: Settler Colonialism, Maternalism, and the Removal of Indigenous Children in the American West and Australia, 1880-1940; Tyrell, True Garden of the Gods: Californian-Australian Environmental Reform, 1860-1930; Wilson, “West of the West?” The Territory of Hawai’i, the American West, and American Imperialism in the Twentieth Century; Whitehead, Completing the Union (Alaska and Hawaii); Wrobel, Global West, American Frontier; Lamar and Thompson, eds., The Frontier in History: North America and South Africa Compared

THE URBAN WEST: Cronon, Nature’s Metropolis, Abbott, The Metropolitan Frontier, and How Cities Won the West; Berglund, Making San Francisco American; Brechin, Imperial San Francisco; Findlay, Magic Lands; Hise, Magnetic Los Angeles; Klingle, Emerald City; Moehring, Resort City in the Sunbelt, Moehring, Urbanism & Empire; Rothman, Neon Metropolis; Self, American Babylon; Thrush, Native Seattle; Whittaker, Race Work; Sanders, Seattle and the Roots of Urban Sustainability

 WATER POLICY: Pisani, Water and American Government, and To Reclaim a Divided West, and Water, Land, and Law in the West; Worster, Rivers of Empire, and A River Running West; Hundley, Jr., The Great Thirst, and Water and the West; Schneiders, Big Sky Rivers; Mulholland, William Mulholland and the Rise of Los Angeles; Reisner, Cadillac Desert; Wilkinson, Crossing the Next Meridian; Ward, Border Oasis: Water and the Political Ecology of the Colorado River Delta, 1940-1975

CULTURE

ART, FILM & LITERATURE:

Goetzmann and Goetzmann, The West of the Imagination; Prown et al., Discovered Lands, Invented Pasts: Transforming Visions of the American West; Truettner, The West as America: Reinterpreting Images of the Frontier, 1820-1920; Sandweiss, Print the Legend: Photography and the American West; Aquila, Wanted: Dead or Alive: The American West in Popular Culture; Etulain, Reimagining the Modern American West, and Telling Western Stories; Robinson, ed., The New Western History; Allmendinger, Ten Most Wanted; Comer, Landscapes of the New West; Campbell, The Rhizomatic West; Tompkins, West of Everything; Coyne, The Crowded Prairie; Mitchell, Westerns; Lenihan, Showdown; Slotkin, Gunfighter Nation; Beck, Dirty Wars; Smith, Virgin Land

GENDER AND SEXUALITY: Johnson, Roaring Camp, Gutiérrez, When Jesus Came the Corn Mothers Went Away; Hurtado, Intimate Frontiers, Boag, Same Sex Affairs, and Re-Dressing America’s Frontier Past; Berglund, Making San Francisco American; Matsumoto and Allmendinger, eds., Over the Edge; Sides, The Erotic City (San Francisco); Hurewitz, Bohemian Los Angeles; Faderman and Timmons, Gay L.A.; Rico, Nature’s Noblemen.

INDIAN HISTORY: Blackhawk, Violence Over the Land; Fixico, Indian Resilience and Rebuilding: Indigenous Nations in the Modern American West; West, The Contested Plains; and The Last Indian War; White, The Roots of Dependency; Fisher, Shadow Tribe; Rollings, Unaffected by the Gospel; Hoxie, Parading through History, and This Indian Country: American Indian Activists and the Place They Made; Thrush, Native Seattle; Bauer,”We Were All Like Migrant Workers Here”; Hämäläinen, The Comanche Empire; DeLay, War of a Thousand Deserts; Smoak; Ghost Dances and Identity; Deloria, Playing Indian, and Indians in Unexpected Places; Yarbrough, Race and the Cherokee Nation; Anderson, The Conquest of Texas; Metcalf, Termination’s Legacy; Piker, The Four Deaths of Acorn Whistler

LABOR: Peck, Reinventing Free Labor; Jameson, All that Glitters; Robbins, Colony and Empire; Foley, The White Scourge; Andrews, Killing for Coal; Chiang, Shaping the Shoreline

MYTH & MEMORY: Athearn, The Mythic West; Christensen, Red Lodge and the Mythic West; Faragher, Daniel Boone; Slotkin, Gunfighter Nation, and The Fatal Environment, and Regeneration through Violence; Smith, Virgin Land; Walton, Storied Land; Wrobel, Promised Lands; Hausladen, ed., Western Places, American Myths; Wilson, The Myth of Santa Fe; Kropp, California Veja; Johnson, Hunger for the Wild; Jacoby; Shadows at Dawn; Ari Kelman, A Misplaced Massacre; Bokovoy, The San Diego World’s Fairs & Southwestern Memory; Burke, Greenwich Village to Taos; Klein, The History of Forgetting: Los Angeles and the Erasure of Memory

RACE RELATIONS: Avila, Popular Culture in the Age of White Flight; Camarillo, Chicanos in a Changing Society; Gutierrez, Walls and Mirrors; Sanchez, Becoming Mexican American; Lee and Yung, Angel Island; Matsumoto, Farming the Home Place; Broussard, Black San Francisco; Monroy, Rebirth; Casas, Married to a Daughter of the Land; Taylor, In Search of the Racial Frontier, and The Forging of a Black Community (Seattle); Flamming, Bound for Freedom; Brilliant, The Color of America is Changing; Sides, L.A. City Limits; Deverell, Whitewashed Adobe

TOURISM: Pomeroy, In Search of the Golden West; Rothman, Devil’s Bargains, and ed., The Culture of Tourism, the Tourism of Culture; Shaffer, See America First; Wrobel & Long, eds., Seeing & Being Seen; Coleman, Ski Style; Childers, American Powder Keg; Chiang, Shaping the Shoreline; Philpott, Vacationland (Colorado)

Historiographical Essay (due in class, week 16/Finals Week, December 9):

A 15-20 page paper on a well-defined historiographic topic.  Possible topics will be explored during the semester and include the full range of weekly topics.  Or, you might examine the work and career of a key western historian/writer who is not included in Etulain, ed’s, Writing Western History, e.g., contemporary historians Patricia Limerick, Donald Worster, Richard White, William Cronon, Elliott West, Walter Nugent, Howard Lamar, Richard Etulain, or a deceased historian, e.g. Francis Parkman, Theodore Roosevelt, Bernard DeVoto, Wallace Stegner, Carey McWilliams, Wilbur Jacobs, Gerald Nash, Vine DeLoria, Jr., Angie Debo, Mari Sandoz, Hal Rothman, David Weber.  These are merely suggestions.

The most important consideration is that you choose a topic that will directly contribute to the building of your scholarly expertise in the sub-field in which you will research and write your thesis or dissertation.

The historiographical essay should:

  1. provide a clear overview of the scholarship on the topic, or the work of a single historian (along the lines of the essays in Writing Western History;
  2. arrange the scholarship in an effective manner, generally chronologically or thematically, or a combination of the two;
  3. reach some conclusions concerning how and why that scholarship (or that individual’s career) has unfolded according to certain patterns;
  4. offer some suggestions for new and innovative work in the field, or some concluding statements on an individual historian’s contributions to the field.

The historiographical essay should not be a mere cataloging of works in the field; such an exercise fits the label of annotated bibliography, or bibliography essay, but not that of historiographical essay.

Richard W. Etulain, ed., Writing Western History contains excellent examples of how to construct an essay on a single historian.  Historiographic overviews of work in particular sub-fields of American western history, including economic, environmental, political, urban, and women’s history, are collected in Gerald D. Nash and Richard W. Etulain, Researching Western History: Topics in the Twentieth Century (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1997), in Deverell, ed., A Companion to the American West, and Wrobel, ed., “The West Enters the Twenty-First Century” (though the essays in this special issue of The Historian are for the most part less extensive than the one you are required to write).

WEEKLY READINGS

WK 1: AUG. 19: Introduction + The West in Popular and Historical Imaginations

 WK 2: AUG. 26: THE WEST AS FRONTIER  

  1. I) Faragher, John Mack. Introduction, in Re-reading FJT, 1-10.
  1. II) Turner, Frederick Jackson. “The Significance of History” (1891) in Turner, Re-reading FJT, 11-30.

III) Turner, Frederick Jackson. “The Significance of the Frontier in American History” (1893), in Turner, Rereading FJT, 31-60.

  1. IV) Faragher, John Mack. “Afterword: Significance of the Frontier in American Historiography,” in Turner, Rereading FJT, 225-255.
  1. V) Etulain, Richard W. “The Rise of Western Historiography,” in Etulain, ed., Writing Western History, 1-16.
  1. VI) Cronon, William. “Turner’s First Stand: The Significance of Significance in American History,” in Etulain, Writing Western History, 43-70.

VII) Etulain, Richard W.  “After Turner: The Historiography of Frederick Logan Paxson,” in Etulain, Writing Western History, 103-135.

VIII) Limerick, Patricia Nelson.  “Persistent Traits and the Persistent Historian: The American Frontier and Ray Allen Billington,” in Etulain, ed., Writing Western History, 277-310.

  1. IX) Reader, #35. Klein, Kerwin Lee. “Introduction: History, Narrative, West,” in Frontiers of Historical Imagination: Narrating the European Conquest of Native America, 1890-1990. Berkeley and Los Angeles: U of Cal P, 1997: 1-12 (301-302).

Turner, Rise of the New West, 1819-1829; Turner, Rereading FJT; Webb, The Great Frontier; Bogue, Frederick Jackson Turner: Strange Roads Going Down; Billington, Frederick Jackson Turner: Historian, Scholar, Teacher; Jacobs; On Turner’s Trail; Klein, Frontiers of Historical Imagination, Hofstadter, The Progressive Historians, Novick, That Noble Dream 

WK 3: SEPT. 9: THE WEST AS REGION

  1. I) Hine, Robert V. “Josiah Royce: The West as Community,” in Etulain, ed., Writing Western History, 19-41.
  1. II) Peterson, Charles S. “Hubert Howe Bancroft: First Western Regionalist,” in Etulain, ed., Writing Western History, 43-70.

III) Steiner, Michael C.  “Frederick Jackson Turner and Western Regionalism,” in Etulain, ed., Writing Western History, 73-101.

  1. IV) West, Elliott. “Walter Prescott Webb and the Search for the West,” in Etulain, ed., Writing Western History, 167-191.
  1. V) Worcester, Donald C. “Herbert Eugene Bolton: The Making of a Western Historian,” in Etulain, ed., Writing Western History, 193-213.
  1. VI) Bogue, Allan G. “James C. Malin: A Voice from the Grassland,” in Etulain, ed., Writing Western History, 215-243.

VII) Turner, “The Significance of the Section in American History,” (1925), in Turner, Rereading FJT, 201-224.

VIII) Webb, Walter Prescott.  “The American West: Perpetual Mirage,” Harper’s Magazine, 214 (May 1957): 25-31.

  1. IX) Webb, Walter Prescott. “Introduction,” The Great Plains. 1931, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1981: 3-9.

Books: Royce, California; Bancroft, The Works of Hubert Howe Bancroft (39 vols.); Bolton, The Spanish Borderlands; Webb, The Great Plains; Turner, The Significance of Sections in American History; Turner, The United States, 1830-1850: The Nation and Its Section; Malin, The Grassland of North America; Hurtado, Herbert Eugene Bolton

WK 4: SEPT. 16: THE WEST AS MYTH & MEMORY

  1. I) Smith, Henry Nash. “The Garden and the Desert,” and “The Myth of the Garden and Turner’s Frontier Hypothesis,” in Virgin Land: The American West as Symbol and Myth. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1950, 1978:174-183 (285-287), and 250-260 (295-298), respectively.
  1. II) Mitchell, Lee Clark. “Henry Nash Smith’s Myth of the West,” in Etulain, ed., Writing Western History, 247-275.

III) Athearn, Robert G.  “Epilogue: The Genesis of the Mythic West,” The Mythic West in Twentieth-Century America.  Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1986: 249-275 (307-309).

  1. IV) Slotkin, Richard. “Search and Rescue/Search and Destroy: The Indian-Hater as Counterguerrilla, from Ch. 14, “Gunfighters and Green Berets: Imagining the Counterinsurgency Warrior, 1956-1960,” in Gunfighter Nation: The Myth of the Frontier in Twentieth-Century America. New York: Atheneum, 1992: 461-473 (737-738).
  1. V) Hyde, Anne F. “Cultural Filters: The Significance of Perception” (with commentaries by Martha A. Sandweiss and Elliott West), in Clyde A. Milner, ed., A New Significance: Re-Envisioning the History of the American West. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996: 175-211.
  1. VI) Walton, John. “Introduction,” in Storied Land: Community and Memory in Monterey. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2001: 1-10.

VII) Wrobel, David M.  “The Ghosts of Western Future and Past,” in Promised Lands: Promotion, Memory, and the Creation of the American West (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2002), 181-199 (264-270).

VIII) Kropp, Phoebe.  “Conclusion: The Trouble with Red Tile Roofs,” in California Veja: Culture and Memory in a Modern American Place.  Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2006, 261-69.

IX: Warren, Louis.  “Introduction,” to Buffalo Bill’s America: William Cody and the Wild West Show.  New York: Alfred A. Knopf., 2005, ix-xvi.

  1. X) West, Elliott. “Stories,” in The Essential West: Collected Essays (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2012), 290-311.

Supplemental Reading: Faragher, John Mack.   “Left Until I’m Put in the Ground: Myth and Memory,” in Daniel Boone: The Life and legend of an American Pioneer.  New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1992: 320-362 (411-418).

Books: Smith, Virgin Land; Athearn, The Mythic West; Slotkin, Gunfighter Nation; Faragher, Daniel Boone; Wrobel, Promised Lands; Christensen, Red Lodge and the Mythic West; Kropp, California Vieja.; Warren, Buffalo Bill’s America.

 WK 5: SEPT. 23: “C” WORDS, I: COLONIALISM, COMPARISON, CONTINUITY & CAPITALISM

  1. I) DeVoto, Bernard. “The West: A Plundered Province,” Harper’s, August 1934; reprinted in Douglas Brinkley and Patricia Limerick, eds., The Western Paradox: A Conservation Reader: Bernard DeVoto (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001): 3-21.
  1. I) Pomeroy, Earl. “Toward a Reorientation of Western History: Continuity and Environment,” Mississippi Valley Historical Review, 41 (March 1955): 579-600.

III) Pomeroy, Earl.  “Introduction: New and Old in the Far West,” and “The Trend of the Far West,” in The Pacific Slope: A History of California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Utah, and Nevada.  1965, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1991: 3-7 and 372-397.

  1. IV) Malone, Michael P. “Earl Pomeroy and the Reorientation of Western History,” in Etulain, ed., Writing Western History, 311-334.
  1. V) Robbins, William G. “In Pursuit of Historical Explanation: Capitalism as a Conceptual Tool for Knowing the American West,” Western Historical Quarterly, 30 (Autumn 1999): 277-293.
  1. VI) Nugent, Walter. “Comparing Wests and Frontiers,” in Clyde A. Milner II, Carol A. O’Connor, and Martha Sandweiss, eds., The Oxford History of the American West. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994: 803-833.

Supplemental Reading:

Pomeroy, Earl.  “Frontiers of Land and Opportunity,” in The American Far West in the Twentieth Century.  New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008, 376-403 and 530-33. 

Books: Pomeroy, The Territories and the United States, 1861-1890; The Pacific Slope; In Search of the Golden West; The American Far West in the Twentieth Century; Robbins, Colony and Empire; Brinkley and Limerick, eds., The Western Paradox; Nugent, Into the West: The Story of It’s People; and Crossings. 

WK 6: SEPT. 30: “C” WORDS, II: CONTINUITY (CONTINUED) & CONQUEST 

  1. I) Limerick, Patricia Nelson. The Legacy of Conquest: The Unbroken Past of the American West. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 2006, 1987, passim.
  1. II) Limerick, Patricia Nelson, Donald Worster, Susan Armitage, Michael P. Malone, and David J. Weber, “The Legacy of Conquest, by Patricia Nelson Limerick: A Panel of Appraisal,” Western Historical Quarterly, 20 (August 1989): 303-322.

Books: Limerick, Desert Passages, The Legacy of Conquest, Something in the Soil; Limerick, Rankin, and Milner, eds., Trails. 

WK 7: OCTOBER 7: THE NEW WESTERN HISTORY

  1. I) Limerick, Patricia Nelson. “What On Earth Is the New Western History?,” in Patricia Nelson Limerick, Clyde A. Milner II, and Charles E. Rankin, eds., Trails Toward a New Western History. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1991: 81-88 (224-226).
  1. II) West, Elliott. “A Longer, Grimmer, But More Interesting Story,” in Limerick, Milner, and Rankin, eds., Trails: 103-111 (228-230).

III) White, Richard.  “Trashing the Trails,” in Limerick, Milner, and Rankin, eds., Trails: 26-39 (216-217).

  1. IV) Worster, Donald. “Beyond the Agrarian Myth,” in Under Western Skies: Nature and History in the American West. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992: 3-18 (255); originally published in Limerick, Milner, and Rankin, eds., Trails: 3-25.
  1. V) McMurtry, Larry. “How the West Was Won or Lost: The Revisionist’s Failure of Imagination,” The New Republic, October 22, 1990: 32-38.
  1. VI) Nash, Gerald. “Conclusion,” Creating the West: Historical Interpretations, 1890-1990. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1991: 259-277.

VII) Scott, Janny.  “New Battleground of the Old West: Academia.  Scholarly Duel Pits Revisionists Vs. Traditionalists.”  Los Angeles Times, May 18, 1993: 6-8.

VIII) Etulain, Richard W.  “Visions and Revisions: Recent Interpretations of the American West,” in Etulain, ed., Writing Western History: 335-358.

  1. IX) Etulain, Richard W. “Postregional Histories,” in Re-Imagining the Modern American West: A Century of Fiction, History, and Art. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1996: 160-181 (226-230).

Books:

Limerick, Milner, and Rankin, eds., Trails; Milner, ed., A New Significance; Cronon, Miles, and Gitlin, eds., Under an Open Sky; Nash, Creating the West; Etulain, Re-Imagining the Modern American West; Gressley, Old West, New West. 

WK 8: OCT. 14: THE NEW WEST IN ART & LITERATURE 

  1. I) Truettner, William. “Introduction,” in The West as America: Reinterpreting Images of the American Frontier. Washington, DC: Smithsonian, 1991, _-__.
  1. II) Cronon, William. “Telling Tales on Canvas: Landscapes of Frontier Change,” in Jules David Prown, et al., Discovered Lands, Invented Pasts: Transforming Visions of the American West. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992, 37-87.

III) Goetzmann, William M.  and William N. Goetzmann, “Bierstadt’s Mighty Mountains,” in The West of the Imagination.  New York: W. W. Norton, 1986; Second Edition Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2009, 199-210.

  1. IV) Dippie, Brian. “Drawn to the West,” Western Historical Quarterly, 35 (Spring 2004): 5-26.
  1. V) Sandweiss, Marnie. “Introduction: Picture Stories: Photography and the Nineteenth-Century West,” and Epilogue: Pictures as History and Memory: Photography and the Story of the Western Past,” in Print the Legend: Photography and the American West. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002, 1-14 (345), and 325-44 (388-90), respectively.
  1. VI) Allmendinger, Blake, “The White Open Spaces,” from Ten Most Wanted: The New Western Literature (New York: Routledge, 2008), 17-32.

VII) Fisk, Jerome, and Forrest G. Robinson.  “Introduction,” in The New Western History: The Territory Ahead.  Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1998, 1-15.

VIII) Comer, Krista.  “Literature, Gender Studies, and the New Western History,” in Forrest G. Bobinson, ed., The New Western History: The Territory Ahead.  Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1998, 99-134.

  1. IX) Tompkins, Jane. “Introduction,” in West of Everything: The Inner Life of Westerns. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992, 2-19.

Books, Allmendinger, Ten Most Wanted, Robinson, The New Western History; Comer, Landscapes of the New West; Etulain, Re-Imagining the Modern American West, and Telling Western Stories; Aquila, ed., Wanted, Dead or Alive; Goetzmann and Goetzmann, The West of the Imagination; Prown, et al, Discovered Lands, Invented Pasts; Truettner, ed., The West as America; Sandweiss, Print the Legend; Dippie, Catlin and His Contemporaries. 

WK 9: OCT. 21: 1: WHERE THE WEST IS AND WHY IT MATTERS: MAPS, BORDERS, AND OCEANS

  1. I) Nugent, Walter. “Where is the American West: Report on a Survey,” Montana: The Magazine of Western History, 42 (Summer 1992): 2-23.
  1. II) Steiner, Michael C., and David M. Wrobel, “Many Wests: Discovering a Dynamic Western Regionalism,” in Wrobel and Steiner, eds., Many Wests: Place, Culture, and Regional Identit Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1997: 1-30.

III) Findlay, John.   “A Fishy Proposition: Regional Identity in the Pacific Northwest,” in Wrobel and Steiner, eds., Many Wests: 37-70. 

  1. IV) Montoya, María E. “Landscapes of the Cold War West,” in Kevin J. Fernlund, ed., The Cold War American West, 1945-1989. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1998: 8-27.
  1. V) “Atlas of the New West: Forum,” Pacific Historical Review, 67 (Aug 1998): 379-420.
  1. VI) Elizabeth Jameson and Jeremy Mouat. “Telling Differences: The Forty-Ninth Parallel and Historiographies of the West and Nation,” Pacific Historical Review, 75 (May 2006), 183-230.

VII) Adelman, Jeremy, and Stephen Aron.   “From Borderlands to Borders: Empires, Nation-States, and the Peoples in between in North American History,” American Historical Review, 104 (June 1999): 814-41.

VIII) Evans, Sterling.  “Introduction: Dependent Harvests,” in Bound in Twine: The History and Ecology of the Henequen-Wheat Complex for Mexico and the American and Canadian Plains, 1880-1950. College Station: Texas A&M UP, 2007, xvii-xxiii (241-2).

  1. IX) Igler, David. “Diseased Goods: Global Exchanges in the Eastern pacific Basin, 1770-1850,” American Historical Review, 109 (June 2004), 693-719.
  1. X) Truett, Samuel. “Prologue: Hidden Histories,” in Fugitive Landscapes: The Forgotten History of the US-Mexico Borderlands. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007, 1-9.

Supplemental Reading:

Nugent, Walter.  “Where the West Is and Why People Have Gone There,” Into the West: The Story of Its People.  New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1999: 3-17 (381-382).

Emmons, David.  “Constructed Province: History and the Making of the Last American West,” and “A Roundtable: Six Responses…and a Final Statement by the Author,” Western Historical Quarterly, 25 (Winter 1994): 436-459 and 461-486.

Books:

Riebsame, ed., The Atlas of the New West; Wrobel and Steiner, Many Wests; Nugent, Into the West; Ayers, et al, All Over the Map; Igler, The Great Ocean; Evans, Bound in Twine, and The Borderlands of the American & Canadian Wests; St. John, Line in the Sand: Belich, Replenishing the Earth. 

WK 10: OCT. 28: WESTERN ENVIRONMENTS, I: CITIES

  1. I) Cronon, William. “Prologue: Cloud Over Chicago,” and “Epilogue: When We Were Driving,” in Nature’s Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1991: 5-19 (392-393) and 371-385 (467-469).
  1. II) Moehring, Eugene. “Introduction: Urbanism and Empire,” and “Epilogue: Towns, the Frontier, and Colonialism,” in Urbanism and Empire in the Far West, 1840-1890. Reno and Las Vegas: University of Nevada Press, 2004: xvii-xxx (340-343), and 311-321 (384-385).

III) Findlay, John M.  “Western Cityscapes and American Culture,” in Magic Lands: Western Cityscapes and American Culture After 1940.  Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1992: 265-303 (367-375).

  1. IV) Hise, Greg. “Introduction: Suburbanization as Urbanization,” in Magnetic Los Angeles: Planning the Twentieth-Century Metropolis. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999, 1-13.
  1. V) Abbott, Carl. “Introduction: All Roads Lead to Fresno,” and “Conclusion: Urban Frontiers,” in How Cities Won the West: Four Centuries of Urban Change in Western North America. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2008, 1-15 (291-93), 274-290 (318-20).
  1. VI) Abbott, Carl. “Multicentered Cities,” in The Metropolitan Frontier: Cities in the Modern American West. Tucson: U of AZ Press, 1993: 123-148 (205-206).

VII) Sanders, Jeffrey Craig.  “Prologue: The Battle in Seattle,” in Seattle and the Roots of Urban Sustainability: Inventing Ecotopia.  University of Pittsburgh Press, 2010, 1-15 (239-45). 

Supplemental Reading

Lotchin, Roger.  “The Impending Western Urban Past: An Essay on the Twentieth Century West,” in Gerald D. Nash and Richard W. Etulain, eds., Researching Western History: Topics in the Twentieth Century.  Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1997: 53-81.

Books: Cronon, Nature’s Metropolis, Abbott, The Metropolitan Frontier, and How Cities Won the West; Findlay, Magic Lands; Moehring, Urbanism and Empire in the Far West; Rothman, Neon Metropolis; Hise, Magnetic Los Angeles; Sanders, Seattle and the Roots of Urban Sustainability; Klingle, Emerald City. 

WK 11: NOV. 4: WESTERN ENVIRONMENTS, II: WATER

  1. I) Worster, Donald. “New West, True West,” Under Western Skies: Nature and History in the American West. New York: OUP, 19-33 (255-257).
  1. II) Worster, Donald. “Introduction: Reflections in a Ditch,” and “Conclusion: Nature, Freedom, and the West,” Rivers of Empire: Natue, Aridity, and the Growth of the American West (New York: Oxford University Press, 1985), 3-15 (339-340), and 329-337 (388).

III) Pisani, Donald J.  “Conclusion: Retrospect and Significance,” in Water and American Government: The Reclamation Bureau, National Water Policy, and the West, 1902-1935.  Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2002, 272-95 (382-87).

  1. I) Cronon, William. “A Place for Stories: Nature, History, and Narrative,” Journal of American History, 78 (March 1992): 1347-1376.
  1. V) White, Richard. The Organic Machine: The Remaking of the Columbia River (Hill and Wang, 1996), passim.

Supplemental Reading:

Hundley, Norris, Jr.  “Water and the West in Historical Imagination: Part Two—A Decade Later,” in The Historian, 66 (Fall 2004): 455-90.

Books: Worster, Dust Bowl; Worster, Rivers of Empire, A River Running West, Dust Bowl, Under Western Skies; White, The Organic Machine; Hundley, The Great Thirst; Pisani, To Reclaim a Divided West, and Water and American Government.

WK 12: NOVEMBER 11: WESTERN ENVIRONMENTS, III: WILDERNESS

  1. I) Nash, Roderick. “The Wilderness Cult,” in Wilderness and the American Mind. 1967; Third Ed., New Haven: Yale University Press, 1982: 141-160.
  1. II) Cronon, William. “The Trouble with Wilderness; or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature,” in William Cronon, ed., Uncommon Ground: Toward Reinventing Nature. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1995, 69-90 (479-482).

III) White, Richard.  “’Are You an Environmentalist or Do You Work for a Living?’: Work and Nature,” in Cronon, ed., Uncommon Ground, (499-501).

  1. IV) Limerick, Patricia Nelson. “Mission to the Environmentalists,” in Something in the Soil: 171-185 (362).
  1. V) Jacoby, Karl: “Introduction: The Hidden History of American Conservation,” and Epilogue: Landscapes of Myth and Memory,” in Crimes Against Nature: Squatters, Poachers, Thieves, and the Hidden History of American Conservation. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2000: 1-7 (203-207) and 193-198 (264-265).
  1. VI) Kirk, Andrew. “Appropriating Technology: The Whole Earth Catalog & Counterculture Environmental Politics, Environmental History, 6 (July 2001): 374-94.

VII) Rothman, Hal.  “A Decade in the Saddle: Confessions of a Recalcitrant Editor,” Environmental History, 7 (January 2002): 9-21.

VIII) Rome, Adam.  “The Genius of Earth Day,” Environmental History, 15 (April 2010): 194-205.

  1. IX) Nash, Linda. “Introduction,” in Inescapable Ecologies: A History of Environment, Disease, and Knowledge. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2006, 1-15 (218-21).

Supplemental Reading: Jacobs, Wilbur R.  “The Great Despoliation: Environmental Themes in American Frontier History,” The Fatal Confrontation: Historical Studies of American Indians, Environment, and Historians.  Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1996: 11-39 (originally published in Pacific Historical Review, 1978).

Kirk, Andrew G.  “Environmental Heresies,” in Counterculture Green: The Whole Earth Catalog and American Environmentalism. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2007.

Hays, Samuel P.  “The Conservation Movement and the Progressive Tradition,” in Conservation and the Gospel of Efficiency: The Progressive Conservation Movement, 1890-1920.  (1959), University of Pittsburgh Press 1999: 261-276.

Books: Hays, Conservation and the Gospel of Efficiency; Nash, Wilderness and the American Mind; Jacobs, The Fatal Confrontation; Pyne, Fire in America; Cronon, Changes in the Land; Cronon, ed., Uncommon Ground; Jacoby, Crimes Against Nature; Kirk, Collecting Nature and Counterculture Green; Herron and Kirk, eds., Human Nature; White, The Organic Machine; White, Roots of Dependency; Barringer, Selling Yellowstone; Nash, Inescapable Ecologies; Warren, The Hunter’s Game.

WK 13: NOVEMBER 18:

  1. WESTERN CULTURES, I: GENDER, SEXUALITY, & LABOR
  2. HISTORIOGRAPHY PRESENTATIONS, GROUP A
  1. I) Faragher, John Mack. “Masculine Men and Feminine Women,” in Women and Men on the Overland Trai New Haven: Yale UP, 1979: 88-110 (228-239).
  1. II) Gutiérrez, Ramón A. “The Pueblo Indian World in the Sixteenth Century,” in When Jesus Came, The Corn Mothers Went Away: Marriage, Sexuality, and Power in New Mexico, 1500-1846. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1991: 3-36 (343-348).

III) Morrissey, Katherine G.  “Engendering the West,” in William Cronon, George Miles, and Jay Gitlin, eds., Under an Open Sky: Rethinking America’s Western Past.  New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1992: 132-144 (307-312).

  1. IV) Hurtado, Albert L. “Sexuality in California’s Franciscan Missions,” Sex, Gender, and Culture in Old California. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1999: 1-19 (145-149).
  1. V) Johnson, Susan Lee. “Bulls, Bears, and Dancing Boys,” in Roaring Camp: The Social World of the California Gold Rush. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 2000: 141-183 (418-423).
  1. VI) Jameson, Elizabeth. “A White Man’s Camp,” in All that Glitters: Class, Conflict, and Community in Cripple Creek. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998: 140-160 (309-315).

VII) Peck, Gunther.  “Manhood Mobilized,” in Reinventing Free Labor: Padrones and Immigrant Workers in the North American West, 1880-1930.  Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, 2000): 117-157.

VIII) Scharff, Virginia.  “Man and Nature! Sex Secrets of Environmental History,” in John P. Herron and Andrew G. Kirk, eds., Human Nature: Biology, Culture, and Environmental History.  Albuquerque: U of New Mexico Press, 1999: 31-48. 

Supplemental Reading:

Murphy, Mary.  “Searching for an Angle of Repose: Women, Work, and Creativity in Early Montana,” David M. Wrobel and Michael C. Steiner, eds., Many Wests: Place, Culture, and Regional Identity.  Lawrence: UP of Kansas, 1997: 156-176. 

Books:

Johnson, Roaring Camp; Boag, Same Sex Affairs, and Re-Dressing America’s Frontier Past; Hurtado, Sex, Gender, and Culture; Peck, Reinventing Free Labor, Jameson, All That Glitters; Andrews, Killing for Coal; Faragher, Men and Women on the Overland Trail; Gutiérrez, Ramón A.  “The Pueblo Indian World in the Sixteenth Century,” When Jesus Came, The Corn Mothers Went Away; Scharff, Twenty Thousand Roads.

WK 14: NOVEMBER 25:

  1. 1. WESTERN CULTURES, II: RACE RELATIONS, AND LABOR
  2. HISTORIOGRAPHY PRESENTATIONS, GROUP B
  1. I) Hyde, Anne F. “Introduction: The Geography of Empire in 1804,” in Empires, Nations and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800-1860 (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2011), 1-24 (515-16).
  1. II) Luebke, Frederick. “Introduction,” in Luebke, ed., European Immigrants in the American West: Community Histories. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1998: vii-xix.

III) 10. Deverell, William.  “Ethnic Quarantine,” in Whitewashed Adobe: The Rise of Los Angeles and the Remaking of Its Mexican Past.  Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2004, 172-206 (299-311).

  1. IV) Foley, Neil. “The Whiteness of Manhood: Women, Gender Identity, and “Men’s Work” on the Farm,” in The White Scourge: Mexicans, Blacks, and Poor Whites in Texas Cotton Culture.  Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1997: 141-162 (259-265).
  1. V) Gutiérrez, Ramón A. “Hispanics and Latinos,” in William Deverell, ed., The Blackwell Companion to the American West. Malden, Mass: 2004: 390-411.
  1. VI) Limerick, Patricia Nelson. “Disorientation and Reorientation: The American Landscape Discovered from the West,” in Something in the Soil. New York: Norton, 2000: 186-213 (362-367).

VII) West, Elliott.  “Reconstructing Race,” in The Essential West: Collected Essays.  Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2012, 100-126.

VIII) Jacoby, Karl.  “Introduction,” and “Epilogue,” in Shadows at Dawn: A Borderlands Massacre and the Violence of History (New York: The Penguin Press, 2008), 1-7 (291-92), and 273-78 (320-21)

Books: Deverell, Whitewashed Adobe; Adams, Education for Extinction, Foley, White Scourge; Luebke, ed., European Immigrants in the American West; Matsumoto, Farming the Home Place; Casas, Married to a Daughter of the Land; Broussard, Black San Francisco; Monroy, Rebirth; Gregory, American Exodus; Gutierrez, Walls and Mirrors; Whitaker, Race Work.

WK 15: DEC 2:

  1. WESTERN CULTURES, III: NEW INDIAN HISTORIES, & LABOR
  2. HISTORIOGRAPHY PRESENTATIONS, GROUP C
  1. I) Blackhawk, Ned. “Introduction: The Indigenous Body in Pain,” and “Epilogue: Born on the Fourth of July, or Narrating Nevadan Indian Histories,” in Violence Over the Land: Indians and Empires in the Early American West. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2006, 1-15 (301-04), and 267-93 (352-57).
  1. II) West, Elliott. “Called-Out People: The Cheyennes and the Western Plains,” in The Essential West: Collected Essays (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2012), 57-77.

III) Adams, David Wallace.  “Classroom,” in Education for Extinction: American Indians and the Boarding School Experience, 1875-1928.  Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1995: 136-163 (339 and 363-367).

  1. IV) 89. DeLay, Brian. “Introduction: A Little Door,” in War of a Thousand Deserts: Indian Raids and the US-Mexican War. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008, xiii-xxi.
  1. V) Hämäläinen, Pekka. “Introduction: Reversed Colonialism,” in The Comanche Empire. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008, 1-17.
  1. VI) Bauer, William. “Round Valley Indians and Mendocino County’s Hop Industry, 1875-1929,” in “We Were All Migrant Workers”: Work, Community and Memory on California’s Round Valley Reservation, 1850-1941 (forthcoming, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009).

Supplemental Reading:

West, Elliott. “Introduction,” “Prologue: A Scrap and a Panic,” and “Epilogue: Stories in the Teeth of Life,” The Contested Plains: Indians, Goldseekers, and the Rush to Colorado.  Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1998: xv-xiv (339), 1-14, (339-340), 317-337 (379-381).

Rollings, Willard H., “Osage Hegemony on the Prairie Plains,” in Unaffected by the Gospel: Osage resistance to the Christain Invasion, 1673-1906: A Cultural Victory. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2004: 23-44 (194-198).

Books:

West, The Contested Plains; Rollings, Unaffected by the Gospel; Hoxie, Parading Through History; Bauer, “We Were All Migrant Workers”; Deloria, Philip J.  Indians in Unexpected Places; and Playing Indian; Blackhawk, Violence Over the Land; Hämäläinen, The Comanche Empire; DeLay, War of a Thousand Deserts; Yarbrough, Race and the Cherokee Nation; Metcalf, Termination’s Legacy; Piker, The Four Deaths of Acorn Whistler. 

WK 16: FINALS WEEK: DECEMBER 9:

  1. NEWEST WESTS, (2004, & 2010-2013
  2. HISTORIOGRAPHY PRESENTATIONS, GROUP D
  1. I) Wrobel, David, ed. The Historian, Special Issue, “The West Enters the Twenty-First Century: Appraisals on the State of the Field,” 66 (Fall 2004).
  1. II) West, Elliott. “Lewis and Park; Or, Why It Matters That the West’s Most Famous Explorers Didn’t Get Sick (or at Least Not Really Sick),” in The Essential West: Collected Essays (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2012), 15-43.

III) Your top article or essay, 2010-13